teaching

Geological Engineering

Faculty

Xiaobing Zhou, Professor

Teaching



Fall Semester:

GEOP 302 -- Elements of Geophysics (Fall 05-present)

Principles of physics applied to geology, earth and environmental sciences, with emphasis on exploration of the shallow subsurface (~500 m). Topics include seismic method, electrical resistivity and electrical method, gravity, magnetic method, ground penetrating radar, and remote sensing. Geophysical instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis, and geologic interpretation of geophysical data. This course is for students who want to be practicing civil engineers, geologists, archaeologists, and environmental practitioners, geohydrologist, and/or scientists who need knowledge and skills of modern geophysical methods relevant to their disciplines. (Prerequisites: PHSX 235, PHSX 237, M 274 or permission of instructor.)

PHSX 423 -- Electricity & Magnetism I (Spring 2019 - present)

This is an advanced course on electricity and magnetism for upper level and graduate students. Calculus of vector and field will be introduced or reviewed. Focus will be on basic concepts and laws of electrostatics and magnetostatics; boundary value problems; derivation of capacitance and inductance; non-time varying Maxwell's equations; relationship between force, charge, and motion in electric and magnetic fields; time-varying electric and magnetic fields; time varying Maxwell's equations; derivations of the wave equations for time harmonic fields; plane wave solution of the wave equations; interaction of plane electromagnetic waves to dielectric boundaries, perfect conducting boundaries, and lossy media boundaries. Prerequisites: PHSX 237; M 274 (Differential Equations); PHSX 453(Methods of Theoretical Physics) or M 405(Advanced Engineering Mathematics).

 

GEOP595-01 -- Remote Sensing in Snow Hydrology (Fall 2021)

This course covers advanced topics related to remote sensing and snow hydrology including snow formation, metamorphism, snow physical and optical properties, snow survey, ground networks for snow monitoring, remote sensing techniques (optical, radar, and microwave) for measuring snow cover/snow depth/snow water equivalent, snowmelt runoff modeling driven by remotely sensed snow data, and snow and water resources.


PHSX 322 -- Electronics for Scientists (Fall 05-15)

This course will introduce you the basic concepts and physical principles of electronic elements and elementary circuits, and circuits design in electronics. Emphasis is on analog circuit analysis; semiconductors; diode theory, diodes, and diode circuits; transistor fundamentals, transistors, BJTs, FFETs, MOSFETs; amplifiers, op-amps; logic gates; and integrated circuits. The objectives are to understand how electronic elements and circuits work and to develop capability and skills in analyzing circuits and designing functional circuits from integrated circuit building blocks. (Prerequisites: PHSX 237  and  PHSX 238.)


PHSX 237 -- General Physics III - Electricity, Magnetism, & Wave Motion (Fall 06-09, 11-18)

This is the third course in the calculus-based physics sequence. Basic physical concepts, laws, properties, nature, and implication for modern sciences of electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetic waves are covered. Basic electronic elements - resistor, capacitor, inductaor, etc. are introduced. Basic circuit analysis is covered. The development of problem-solving skills fundamental to students of all branches of engineering will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: M 273 (Multivariable Calculus), PHYS 1046 (General Physics - Mechanics), PHSX 237 (General Physics–Heat, Sound, & Optics). Corequisite: M 274 (Differential Equations)). Textbook: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 7th Edition, Serway & Jewett (Thomson-Brooks/Cole publishers, 2008).


GEOP 425/525 -- Remote Sensing in Earth Sciences/Advanced Remote Sensing (Fall 10 - present )

Emphasis on remote sensing physical principles, imaging principles and systems, satellite image processing, interpretation of remotely sensed data, and integration of remote sensing with GIS. Remote sensing applications to geophysics, geology, hydrology, forestry, agriculture, mineral and oil exploration, natural hazards monitoring (earthquakes, volcanoes, droughts and floods, landslides and land subsidence, wild forest fires), and land and resource management. A brief introduction of GIS will be given from the application point of view so that the integration of remote sensing and GIS can be accomplished. (Prerequisites: PHSX 237 or permission of instructor. GEOP 491 and 595 lectures shared, but 595 is graded separately and additional graduate-level work is required.)


GEOP 595-01 -- Geoprocessing in ArcGIS for Remote Sensing (Fall 09 - )

This is one of our advanced topic courses designed for now as an independent study class only for graduate students. Possibly it will be developed as a lecturing and lab class in the future for advanced upper level students and graduate students. Contents include geoprocessing basics, geoprocessing system tools in the context of ArcGIS, remote sensing data and data formats, geoprocessing model building using ArcGIS ModelBuilder and ERDAS Imagine Modeler for batch processing, geoprocessing model building using scripts in Arc Macro Language (AML), Python, or ERDAS Spatial Modeler Language (SML), integration of remote sensing and GIS for applications in earth and environmental sciences and engineering. (Prerequisites: GEOP 491/595 and permission of instructor).

 

 

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Spring Semetser:


GEOP 412 -- Gravity and Magnetic Exploration (Spring 06-present)

The theory of gravity and magnetic fields of the earth, the principles of field instrumentation and application, the techniques for data acquisition, data reduction and mining, and field data interpretation will be discussed. The emphasis will be on potential theory as applied to the calculation of gravity and magnetic effects, the use of modeling in data interpretation, continuation of potential fields, and processing of field data. Exercises will be devoted to field surveys, data reduction, processing and interpretation. [Prerequisites: PHSX 237 or PHSX 423 (Electricity & Magnetism); M 273 (Multivariable Calculus); M 274 (Differential Equations)]. Textbook: Potential Theory in Gravity & Magnetic Applications by Dr Richard J. Blakely (Cambridge University Press, 1995). Main reference book: Applied Geophysics, 2nd Edition, Chapters 2-3, W. M. Telford, L. P. Geldart, and R. E. Sheri (Cambridge University Press, 2nd Ed., 1990). Instrumentation and field survey: handout.


GEOP 509 -- Problems in Gravity & Magnetic Prospecting (Spring 06-present)

This course is for graduate students and upper level undergraduates. Topics will be selected based on the interests of the class members, but generally will cover topics in potential theory, gravity and magnetic surveys at various scales - from space based satellite gravity, gradiometry, and magnetic measurement, airborne gravity and magnetic surveys, to exploration scale (mining and oil exploration) and reservoir scale (hydrocarbon development), forward modeling and inversion, instrumentation, data reduction and interpretation, or any other topics that class members are interested. (Prerequisites: GEOP 412 or Consent of instructor).

 

PHSX 322 -- Electronics for Scientists (Spring 19)

This course will introduce you the basic concepts and physical principles of electronic elements and elementary circuits, and circuits design in electronics. Emphasis is on analog circuit analysis; semiconductors; diode theory, diodes, and diode circuits; transistor fundamentals, transistors, BJTs, FFETs, MOSFETs; amplifiers, op-amps; logic gates; and integrated circuits. The objectives are to understand how electronic elements and circuits work and to develop capability and skills in analyzing circuits and designing functional circuits from integrated circuit building blocks. (Prerequisites: PHSX 237  and  PHSX 238.)

 

PHSX 237 -- General Physics III - Electricity, Magnetism, & Wave Motion (Spring 06-08, 10-18)

This is the third course in the calculus-based physics sequence. Basic physical concepts, laws, properties, nature, and implication for modern sciences of electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetic waves are covered. Basic electronic elements - resistor, capacitor, inductaor, etc. are introduced. Basic circuit analysis is covered. The development of problem-solving skills fundamental to students of all branches of engineering will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: M 273 (Multivariable Calculus), PHYS 1046 (General Physics - Mechanics), PHYS 2076 (General Physics–Heat, Sound, & Optics). Corequisite: M 274 (Differential Equations)). Textbook: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 7th Edition, Serway & Jewett (Thomson-Brooks/Cole publishers, 2008).


PHSX 423 -- Electricity & Magnetism I (Spring 07-18)

This is an advanced course on electricity and magnetism for upper level and graduate students. Calculus of vector and field will be introduced or reviewed. Focus will be on basic concepts and laws of electrostatics and magnetostatics; boundary value problems; derivation of capacitance and inductance; non-time varying Maxwell's equations; relationship between force, charge, and motion in electric and magnetic fields; time-varying electric and magnetic fields; time varying Maxwell's equations; derivations of the wave equations for time harmonic fields; plane wave solution of the wave equations; interaction of plane electromagnetic waves to dielectric boundaries, perfect conducting boundaries, and lossy media boundaries. Prerequisites: PHSX 237; M 274 (Differential Equations); PHSX 453(Methods of Theoretical Physics) or M 405(Advanced Engineering Mathematics).

 


GEOP 491/595 -- Remote Sensing and GIS Applications (Spring 09)

Emphasis on remote sensing physical principles, imaging principles and systems, satellite image processing, interpretation of remotely sensed data, and integration of remote sensing with GIS. Remote sensing applications to geophysics, geology, hydrology, forestry, agriculture, mineral and oil exploration, natural hazards monitoring (earthquakes, volcanoes, droughts and floods, landslides and land subsidence, wild forest fires), and land and resource management. A brief introduction of GIS will be given from the application point of view so that the integration of remote sensing and GIS can be accomplished. (Prerequisites: PHSX 237 or permission of instructor. GEOP 491 and 595 lectures shared, but 595 is graded separately and additional graduate-level work is required.)

 

GEOP 475W -- Geophysical Engineering Design (Spring 17-present)

A senior level design course requiring the integration of principles, knowledge and skills developed in previous course work. The design problem in geophysical engineering includes the integration of existing geological and geophysical data, specifications for surveys and further data acquisition and as a final phase, the synthesis of all of the information into a geologically reasonable interpretation. (Prerequisites: Senior Standing. Satisfies upper division Writing core.)

 

GEOP 595-01 Aerogravity and aeromagnetic data inversion and interpretation (1-6 credits) (Spring 2020)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of air-borne gravity and magnetic instrumentation, aerogravity and aeromagnetic data collection platforms including powered airplanes and unmanned aircraft systems, data processing, geophysical 2D and 3D inversion, and eventually interpretation using case studies.

 


Summer Session:

 

GEOP 421 -- Field Geology & Geophysics (Co-teach, Summer 06-19)

This is a summer field course for six weeks. The first three week will consist of measurement and description of rock units, mapping on aerial photos and topographic maps, and detailed outcrop mapping of a mining prospect. The rest three weeks will be devoted to geophysical surveys using electrical, gravity, magnetic, and seismic reflection and refraction methods. Focus will be on data collection, analysis using geophysical softwares, and interpretation. These methods will be applied mostly to problems identified during the geologic mapping. The map area contains mineral deposits and complex structures of Montana's over-thrust belt. ( Prerequisite: GEOP 302). Valuable text: Field Geophysics, 3rd Edition, by John Milsom, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., May 2003.